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 Greasy Roads' Vinyl Corner ; What be on his turntable?

Post #1 - 10 Aug 2019, 06:30

Image

I Believe What You Say - Ricky Nelson

I bought this as part of a job lot of Elvis, Buddy Holly, and Ricky Nelson 45s sometime in the 70s. All had obviously been loved and were in perfect nick. At least one of the Ricky Nelson records has a photo of him cut out of a magazine pasted to the sleeve. I defy anyone to find any cut of this song that sounds any better than this 45, in fact it's one of the best sounding things in my collection. James Burton lets rip a couple notes early on which just hints at the sheer glory of the solo later - this sends shivers up my spine every time I hear it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkRUYk6kBsQ

As a postscript Nelson cut a new version of this sometime in the eighties which I heard played on Round Table, a British radio review programme. As it was playing I thought to myself, "Why has he done this? The original was perfect." Dave Edmunds who was one of the reviewers then said exactly the same thing.
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Post #2 - 10 Aug 2019, 08:20

Greasy Roads » Sat Aug 10, 2019 7:30 am wrote:
I Believe What You Say - Ricky Nelson
I defy anyone to find any cut of this song that sounds any better than this 45, in fact it's one of the best sounding things in my collection.


It sounds as tinny as fuck, it needs a good remaster to bring out the full sound quality required.

I can't believe people still collect this outdated and space taking mode of music when you can simply download everything or rip it from Youtube. :rolleyes:
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Steve70nearly
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Post #3 - 10 Aug 2019, 10:34

Greasy Roads » Today, 06:30 wrote:Image

I Believe What You Say - Ricky Nelson

I bought this as part of a job lot of Elvis, Buddy Holly, and Ricky Nelson 45s sometime in the 70s. All had obviously been loved and were in perfect nick. At least one of the Ricky Nelson records has a photo of him cut out of a magazine pasted to the sleeve. I defy anyone to find any cut of this song that sounds any better than this 45, in fact it's one of the best sounding things in my collection. James Burton lets rip a couple notes early on which just hints at the sheer glory of the solo later - this sends shivers up my spine every time I hear it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkRUYk6kBsQ

As a postscript Nelson cut a new version of this sometime in the eighties which I heard played on Round Table, a British radio review programme. As it was playing I thought to myself, "Why has he done this? The original was perfect." Dave Edmunds who was one of the reviewers then said exactly the same thing.


This James Burton solo is one of the most famous and influential in early rock - it's terrific. Burton was known for using the lightest gauge strings he could find - even using banjo strings for the high E - yet he got a full tone out of his guitar. You've got a bit of musical history there.
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Father Hasil Cocteau, SJ;
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Post #4 - 10 Aug 2019, 12:01

Father Hasil Cocteau, SJ » Sat Aug 10, 2019 11:34 am wrote:
Greasy Roads » Today, 06:30 wrote:Image

I Believe What You Say - Ricky Nelson

I bought this as part of a job lot of Elvis, Buddy Holly, and Ricky Nelson 45s sometime in the 70s. All had obviously been loved and were in perfect nick. At least one of the Ricky Nelson records has a photo of him cut out of a magazine pasted to the sleeve. I defy anyone to find any cut of this song that sounds any better than this 45, in fact it's one of the best sounding things in my collection. James Burton lets rip a couple notes early on which just hints at the sheer glory of the solo later - this sends shivers up my spine every time I hear it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkRUYk6kBsQ

As a postscript Nelson cut a new version of this sometime in the eighties which I heard played on Round Table, a British radio review programme. As it was playing I thought to myself, "Why has he done this? The original was perfect." Dave Edmunds who was one of the reviewers then said exactly the same thing.


This James Burton solo is one of the most famous and influential in early rock - it's terrific. Burton was known for using the lightest gauge strings he could find - even using banjo strings for the high E - yet he got a full tone out of his guitar. You've got a bit of musical history there.


Most of his collection is ancient fucking musical history. :laugh:
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In The North
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Post #5 - 10 Aug 2019, 12:33

In The North » 30 minutes ago wrote:
Father Hasil Cocteau, SJ » Sat Aug 10, 2019 11:34 am wrote:
Greasy Roads » Today, 06:30 wrote:Image

I Believe What You Say - Ricky Nelson

I bought this as part of a job lot of Elvis, Buddy Holly, and Ricky Nelson 45s sometime in the 70s. All had obviously been loved and were in perfect nick. At least one of the Ricky Nelson records has a photo of him cut out of a magazine pasted to the sleeve. I defy anyone to find any cut of this song that sounds any better than this 45, in fact it's one of the best sounding things in my collection. James Burton lets rip a couple notes early on which just hints at the sheer glory of the solo later - this sends shivers up my spine every time I hear it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkRUYk6kBsQ

As a postscript Nelson cut a new version of this sometime in the eighties which I heard played on Round Table, a British radio review programme. As it was playing I thought to myself, "Why has he done this? The original was perfect." Dave Edmunds who was one of the reviewers then said exactly the same thing.


This James Burton solo is one of the most famous and influential in early rock - it's terrific. Burton was known for using the lightest gauge strings he could find - even using banjo strings for the high E - yet he got a full tone out of his guitar. You've got a bit of musical history there.


Most of his collection is ancient fucking musical history. :laugh:


And your point is, What? it's better to be ahistorical when it comes to music? Ignorance is a positive stance?
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Father Hasil Cocteau, SJ;
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...before you the wimpled past, behind you the hallooing future...

...Zoom! There goes the gay fuckerteer chasing the tail of light...


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